Whisky Burn

Whisky Burn

€ 24.99

Burns Night1,600 km, 3 weeks, 1 man and his Vespa: Whisky Burn - a travelogue, a reference book and a whisky trail guide. Whisky Burn tells the tale of a three-week odyssey around the highlands and islands of Scotland.

Dublin Liberties Distillery - View to a Still

DLD

The Liberties area of southwest Dublin had once been the centre of distilling in Ireland. A ‘liberty’ was a church-controlled jurisdiction near the city, preserving its own freedom over things like taxes and certain laws – hence the name. Distillers love freedom from taxes, and at one time there were over thirty distilleries here. The area was known as the ‘golden triangle’ of Irish distilling, with residents like Jameson, Power, Roe, not to mention the many breweries. I think there’s one called Guinness still around here somewhere. - Whiskey Burn Chp. 1

Blackwater Distillery - get your kicks down Route 666

Blackwater

Heading along the rather ominously named Route 666 east from Cork to Ballyduff, you will find Blackwater Distillery a stone’s throw from the eponymous river - love that word ‘eponymous’, I never pass up the chance of using it. ‘Black water’ doesn’t really conjure up tasty-looking images of anything you’d like to drink, but Peter Mulryan and his team are doing his best to produce something worth imbibing (‘imbibe’ - another favourite word).

The Cotswolds Distillery

Cotswolds Distillery

The Cotswolds Distillery – Not Cider with Rosie but something a little stronger

Think of the Cotswolds and you think of a gentle, smooth, relaxing landscape; think of Cotswolds whisky and the same three adjectives might spring to mind. Set in a rural area more closely associated with Cider With Rosie than Whisky Galore, the Cotswolds Distillery has been producing gentle, smooth, relaxing English whisky per year since its foundation in 2014.

Penderyn Distillery - not just a man's whisky world

Penderyn distiller/blending team

Penderyn – first Welsh distillery in over a century

Back in the Welsh mists of time, well, not that far back perhaps, 20 years or so, a group of friends met around the table with the landlord of a local pub. They spent the evening drinking local beer, and towards the end of the evening the order for whisky naturally arrived. The barman offered them Scottish, Irish, American whisky, but after drinking Welsh beer all evening, how could they then drink Scottish whisky? Or Irish, or American?